Carbon dating symbol

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Bases may be used to remove contaminating humic acids.Some types of samples require more extensive pre-treatment than others, and these methods have evolved over the first 50 years of radiocarbon dating.For example, it was once standard practice to simply burn whole bones, but the results were eventually seen to be unreliable.Chemical methods for separating the organic (collagen) from the inorganic (apatite) components of bone created the opportunity to date both components and compare the results.During the lifetime of an organism, the amount of c14 in the tissues remains at an equilibrium since the loss (through radioactive decay) is balanced by the gain (through uptake via photosynthesis or consumption of organically fixed carbon).However, when the organism dies, the amount of c14 declines such that the longer the time since death the lower the levels of c14 in organic tissue.Libby calculated the half-life of c14 as 5568 ± 30 years.

The sample is converted to graphite and mounted in an ion source from which it is sputtered and accelerated through a magnetic field.

These so-called "solid-carbon" dates were soon found to yield ages somewhat younger than expected, and there were many other technical problems associated with sample preparation and the operation of the counters.

Gas proportional counters soon replaced the solid-carbon method in all laboratories, with the samples being converted to gases such as carbon dioxide, carbon disulfide, methane, or acetylene.

The diminishing levels via decay means that the effective limit for using c14 to estimate time is about 50,000 years. Subsequent work has shown that the half-life of radiocarbon is actually 5730 ± 40 years, a difference of 3% compared to the Libby half-life.

However, to avoid confusion all radiocarbon laboratories continue to use the half-life calculated by Libby, sometimes rounding it to 5570 years.

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